MultiSystem for Linux

The other day, I found about MultiSystem, a utility that is used to create multi-boot USB drives in Linux using as many bootable distributions as will fit on the drive. I’d seen other multi-boot utilities run from Windows but I was looking for one to use in Linux. This seems to fit the bill.

A Bash script can be be downloaded from http://liveusb.info/multisystem/install-depot-multisystem.sh.tar.bz2. Once you extract it, run it with:

sudo ./install-depot-multisystem.sh

I installed it using their PPA repository.

sudo apt-add-repository ‘deb http://liveusb.info/multisystem/depot all main’
wget -q -O – http://liveusb.info/multisystem/depot/multisystem.asc | sudo apt-key add –
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install multisystem

Once it’s installed it will automatically open. Just click the Close button to exit.

To use it, plug in a USB drive and launch MultiSystem. (It should be in the Menu under Accessories).

  • Select the USB drive and click Confirm.
  • If the drive doesn’t have a label you’ll get an error message. Click OK and the utility will give it one.
  • Unplug and reinsert the drive (if you got the error message) and launch the utility again. Select the drive and confirm.
  • Confirm the GRUB2 installation on the USB drive and click OK to continue.
  • Drag and drop the ISO files (one at a time) to the box at the bottom of the MultiSystem window. You can also click the CD icon and search for them.
  • The ISO files are select individually. It may take awhile for the utility to extract them and update GRUB.
  • You can add as many distributions as space on the drive will allow. You can go back later and add more.
  • As each distribution is added you’ll see them listed in the main window.
  • Once it’s done updating the last distribution, it’s ready to use.

There are extra options in the menus. You can also test the new drive using QEMU or VirtualBox.

The official documentation is in French but I found it simple to use. The first time I tried booting to it, I got a GRUB error but after booting again, it came up okay. I booted to it several times to each of the distributions I’d installed on the drive.

More information can be found at:

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Upgrade gone wrong

I went to update my Dell Optiplex 780 USFF from Mint 17.3 to 18.1. It didn’t really need it but I figured it would be an easy upgrade. I should have known better. I know from years of experience that there are no easy upgrades.

When I tried to boot from my Mint 18.1 Serena Xfce flash drive, I got a kernel panic error on every USB port. Then I attempted to boot to a DVD with Serena with Cinnamon, I got a message saying the device was unavailable. I ran the internal diagnostics which gave me an error code: 2000-0152,”Optical Drive (d): – Incorrect status: (x) (s)”. I was unable to find any of my Dell diagnostic CDs. I pulled the drives out of the other USFF I had lying around, put it in and got the same results. Then the power supply died. I took that as a sign that this upgrade was not to be.

I already had a Dell Latitude E5500 on which I’d already installed Mint 18.1 Xfce so I used it to replace the USFF box. I put it on a docking station, connected it up, and got it running. I’d already installed conky so I just added my Dropbox to it. The primary purpose of the machine will be to have something connected directly to the gateway router for troubleshooting connectivity problems or when I need quick access to a computer at that end of the house. This older laptop will work just fine for that.

I’m still thinking about upgrading my E6500. Hopefully, that will go better. I’m planning to install a larger hard drive so I’ll still have the old drive just in case.

As for the 780s, I’ll donate them, along with a couple of laptops I don’t need any more.

Messing with email

Last night I was thinking about upgrading my laptop to Mint 18.1 even though 17.3 will still be supported for a couple more years. I don’t have much data on it but I figured I’d run a back up and make a list of applications and settings. The laptop was my only Linux machine that was receiving email (but not sending) from my hosted accounts I I figured I’d jot down the settings. I decided to compare them with the Thunderbird settings on my Windows 7 PC which was also receiving but not sending. The settings were different for some reason.

I brought up cPanel and checked the mail setup instructions which were different from either. I got the settings for the laptop and the Win 7 PC from cPanel at different times. Apparently, they occasionally change the recommended settings

I opened up Thunderbird on the main Linux desktop, changed the settings, and they worked. My inboxes began filling up. I successfully sent test messages from both accounts to my gmail. I also made adjustments to the settings in my sbcglobal account which I haven’t used in years except for PPOE login when AT&T was my ISP. And I added my new Time-Warner account.

So far it seems to be working. Another problem solved until the next time something changes.

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